Nature

How To Walk Across A Field With Cows Safely

cows at the gate for a walker

Cows are very curious animals and very rarely hurt walkers. However the sight of a herd of cows running towards you, even if you are behind a gate, is terrifying. The lightest common breed is a Jersey that weighs about 450 kg when fully grown. At the other end a Brown Swiss is about 800 kg. Cows are very muscular compared to humans so it’s natural to be very scared if a herd is stampeding towards you.

Even though incidents are rare it’s best not to take any chances. It can be annoying if it blocks a circular root but if you don’t feel comfortable then go back the way you came if possible.

Some less scrupulous farmers do deliberately put aggressive herds in fields with footpaths to deter walkers. Cows are protective of their calves and can attack if they feel their calves are being threatened.

There is a risk from cows, but considering the millions that use footpaths each year this risk is low. Cows are the most deadly large animal in the UK, however three quarters of fatalities are farm workers. 70% of deaths are from newly calved cows or a bull and the vast majority of deaths of non farm workers are dog walkers with one or two people present.

Tips To Cross A Field With Cows

  • Make yourself as large as possible; put your hands out to your side and wave in order to make you seem larger.
  • Move slowly but assertively forward, don’t run or look them in the eye.
  • If cows get too close turn to face them, stretch your arms to the side and say “GO ON BY!” firmly and confidently. You can also give them a firm but gentle shove if they are crowding.
  • Always have an exit route. Stay close to a hedge if possible and in the worst case scenario you can jump through / into the hedge.
  • Don’t surprise the cows as this can cause them to become aggressive. Remember that a cow has peripheral vision and not frontal vision. The diagram below to shows a cow’s field of vision and blind spots.
  • Find another way around, even if this strays off the footpath – but do return to the footpath as soon as it’s safe.
  • Try to wave them off, especially if you’re at a gate and can jump back to safety. If they back off it’s a good sign that they will leave you alone. Also try bashing a stick on a gate to get them to back off.
  • If you have a dog with you and there are calves in the field then find another way around or turn back. They will protect their young if they see a dog and it is not worth risking.
  • Keep dogs close to you on a lead. If the cow starts to get aggressive or charge let the dog off the lead and make your escape as they will probably chase the dog.
  • Call the farmer, if you have your smart phone on you look for the nearest farm on a map app. Then search for the farm number, even if it is not their herd they will probably be able to direct you to the right farmer who should help.
  • Get out of their vision for a few minutes and they may dissipate allowing for a clear path.
  • Warning bull in field, is sometimes displayed by farmers. This will be a beef bull and they are no more dangerous than cows. Dairy bulls on the other hand are often dangerous.
  • Don’t panic or fluster, they will be able to pick up on this and may think you are there to harm them.
  • If you’re pregnant or feeding try to avoid crossing a field with cows at all. They have been known to take interest in pregnant women.

The diagram above shows a cow’s field of vision. Notice they can not see directly in front of them.

cow field of vision

If you are injured by farm animals it’s important to report it to the relevant public bodies and police. In the UK this should be reported to the Health and Safety Executive.

About the author

Bastian Nest and Glow

I'm a former office worker that quit long days in London to move to the countryside and share natural recipes and lifestyle tips.

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